What is Mechatronics?

As the name implies, Mechatronics is a job that involves a combination of mechanical and electronic skills. It’s becoming more widely adopted in advanced manufacturing operations because it covers a wide array of specialties, and companies are very interested in hiring people who have the knowledge to keep their lines running at full capacity, with as little downtime as possible.

Mechatronics combines elements of electronics, pneumatics, hydraulics, mechanics, IT, computers and robotics.

With instruction in Mechatronics, you’ll be prepared for the modern, automated work force.

Mechatronics skills are in high demand. Some students graduate and report landing jobs earning more than $50,000 within a few months of graduation.

Designed in Collaboration with Employers

The entire Mechatronics curriculum has been designed in partnership with the same companies you'll work for after graduation. 

The program meets industry standards as defined by BMW, Bosch, Fujifilm and Tyco, and students are trained on state-of-the-art mechatronics equipment from suppliers including Kuka Robot Group, Festo, and Siemens.

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Piedmont Technical College’s Mechatronics Technology program is offered in Greenwood, on the Newberry Campus and at the Center for Advanced Manufacturing in Laurens County.

Hands-On Training

Practical training provides the experience you’ll need for a successful career in manufacturing. All plants and industries must be well maintained to run at full capacity, so demand for industrial electronics technicians will remain strong. Students receive first-hand experience with the same kind of tasks they’ll need to handle on the job.

 
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Alumni Profile

Valerie Fennel

After completing degrees in both Mechatronics and Industrial Electronics, Valerie Fennell says she’s found her niche—and she’s doubled her salary, as well. 

After working in industry for years, Fennell had reached the point in her career where she needed to pursue certification in order to advance.

“To move up, the manager said they needed people with a more technical background,” she said. “I had the experience and background, but not the education to go with it.”

 In May 2011, Fennell graduated from Piedmont Tech with an associate degree in Mechatronics and an associate degree in industrial electronics technology. With her new degrees in hand, Fennell has moved on to a job with more advancement potential at GE Aviation in Piedmont, where she is one of only 11 women on the floor.